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Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Frontier Times Magazine Vol 7 No. 3 - December, 1929

Jim Adams; E. M. Ainsworth; Allison; Capt Arrington; Sam Ashburn; ; Amos C. Babcock; Eliza Ward Baker; Fannie Baker; Hance Baker; Capt Moseley Baker; Mrs Moseley Baker; George W. Judge Barcus; Barker; Will C. Barnes; Mrs J. T. Barr; Rev J. T. Barr; H. W. Baylor; Thompson Bean; Jim Bludso; J. L. Bomer; Edward Borein; Borein; Charley Bowdre; Mrs Fred Brown ; G. A. Brown; Mary C. Brown; T. S. Bugbee; A. A. Burck; Burleson; Hinton Caldwell; Austin Callan; Capt Cannon; Capt John W. Cannon; F. G. Carnes; Gen Carr; Jesse Cass; O. S. Clark; J. J. Coates; M. A. Coates; Chas H. Coe; Coke; A. M. Collins; H. E. Conn; Joshua Coppersmith; Lee Corn; Geore Cox; Joseph Cox; Samuel Cox; Cornelius A. Craven; Chief Crazy Horse; Frank P. Crow; Prof Crow; R. F. Cutler; Mrs O. C. Cutter; "Bud" Daggett; Charlie Daggett; John Daggett; Daggett; John P. Daggett; Daggett; Jim Dahlman; A. D. Dardin; Fannie Dardin; Sarah M. Daugherty; Jacob Dibert; ; W. L. R. Dixon; Dobie; Rev E. Dubbs; A. J. Dunlap; Duval; L. R. Dyer; J. B. Earhart; Jim East; Dr O. Eastland; Mrs Amos Edwards; S. P. Elkins; Capt B. L. Elliott; Charles B. Farwell; John V. Farwell; Rip Ford; Jim Fridge; Emiline Gardenhire; ; Pat Garrett; Henry Gernbacher; Gillett; Billy Glass; C. Goodnight; ; Lt A. W. Greeley; Gen Thomas Green; J. M. Harkey; John R. Harris; James B. Hawkins; John Hay; Capt Jack Hayes; John C. (Jack) Hays; Wallace Hebberd; Doc Holliday; John Holmes; Temple Houston; J. Winford Hunt; Rev H. S. Hunter; ; M. R. Hunter; A. T. Jackson; Ross James; Jones;  Bill Kelley; Liza; John B. Kendrick; R. G. Kimbell; W. D. Kindall; John H. Kirby; Gen F. P. Brig Lahm; Pres Lamar; Mrs Fletcher P. Layton; Capt Leathers; Leathers; Capt Thomas P. Leathers; Grooms Lee; R. E. Lee; Lehmann; Vernon Lemley; Dr Louis Leroy; William W. Lewis; Chief Lone Wolf; W. L. Lyon; Marcy ; Bat Mastereson; F. M. McCaleb; McKenzie; D. C. McMeans; Milam; Capt H. C. Miller; George Moore; T. W. Morrison; O. H. Judge Nelson; Ike Newton; Dr Nicholson; Dr M. C. Overton; Capt B. B. Paddock; Frank Parguad; Chief Quanah Parker; J. H. Parks; Charles Elliott Perkins; Gifford Pinchot; C. Pingenot; Jake Platt; John Platt; Radd Platt; Sam Platt; Tom Platt; John W. Poe; E. W. Provine; Chief Rain-In-The-Face; Joshua Raynolds; Tex Richards; Roberts; Dr Joseph W. Robertson; Walter Robertson; Walter M. Robertson; Rose; James Rusk; Santa Anna; ; Saunders; Mattheas Schnell; Chas Shideler; Short; A. L. Shotwell; Hank Simmons; Charley Siringo; Rev J. J. Stanton; Capt Stephen; William C. Stewart; Capt E. T. Sturgeon; Chief Sun-Kee; Wiley Tarter; Abner Taylor; A. W. Judge Terrell; H. Train; Mark Twain; Edward Baron von Woehrmann; L. D. Walters; H. C. Gov Warmouth; W. W. Wheeler; Jim Whisenant; J. M. White; Harrison Whyson; J. P. Wilson; John W. Wilson; Lt Wilson; Edward Baron von Woehrmann; Tom Woolery; Lt Woolford; Lt Woolfork; Wortham; Sam Wright; John Wynan; Archibald Wynnes; Wynne Wynne;

Contents of this volume:

General Tom Green
Brief life account of General Thomas Green who was born in Amelia county, Virginia, June 8, 1814. As a young man, Green, upon learning of the conditions of Texas, came and joined the Texan army as a private, in March, 1836, and was in the campaign that culminated April 21, at San Jacinto. He was promoted to a lieutenancy for gallantry in this bat­tle. He then held many official position until 1861, he enlisted in the Confed­erate Army. Early in 1861 he was made colo­nel of a regiment in the Sibley expedi­tion into New Mexico and performed conspicuous service in the Battle of Val Verde. On the 31st of December, 1862, he was in immediate command of the forces that captured Galveston, and from that time up to his death he was in various campaigns in Louisiana. On the 12th day of April, 1864, he was killed at the battle of Blair's Landing, on Red River, in Louisiana.
The Loss Valley Fight
The Following account of the Loss Valley Fight was re­lated by Walter M. Robertson of AustinTexas, who with his com­rade, William W. Lewis, of Menard, were members of Maj. John B. Jones’ escort detailed, from Co. D. Frontier Battalion.  The account begins by relating the events of the Adobe Walls Fight which took place in June 1874,  and then to describe in detail the Loss Valley fight. Contains old B&W phot showing: S. P. Elkins, Tishomingo, Oklahoma; H. E. Corin, Floresville, Texas; W. W. Lewis, Menard, Texas; J. M. Harkey, San, Saba, Texas;  T. L. Bomer, San Saba, Texas; Walter Robertson, Austin, Texas; Captain Dan W. Roberts, Austin, Texas; James B. Hawkins, Montana.
Further Mentions: Mr. Robertson * Jesse Cass and Tom Woolery * Quanah Parker, Comanche, and Lone Wolf, the Kiowa chief. * Major John B. Jones * Captain Stephen's company * Lieutenant Wilson of Stephens' com­pany * Walter M, Robertson and Ross James * Lee Corn of Coldwell's Com­pany * George Moore of Maltby's Company * Bailey and Porter, of Stephens' Company * William W. Lewis, now of Menard, and Walter M. Robertson of Austin * Dr. Nicholson * John Holmes from Company D.  * Jacks­boro * Billy Glass * Grooms Lee * Lov­ing's ranch * Wheeler * Salt Creek * Walter M. Robertson  * Dr. Joseph W. Robertson * 
Story Of Buried Treasure In West Texas
By H. W. Baylor.
Three significant accounts of treasure in Texas are related here.  First, a treasure buried near the old road that leads from Uvalde to Los Moras, secondly, a buried treasure at a place known as the Cariza Pass, and thirdly a treasure on the road from San Antonio to Bandera.
Further mentions:   C. Pingenot, one of the pioneers of West Texas, a Southern soldier and a princely gentle­man * Turkey Creek * John Wynan, a stone mason who made his home with Mr. Pingenot * "The -Louisiana Tigers," a noted Con­federate regiment from New Orleans * Uncle Bill Kelley, who had lived in almost every county in West Texas * Captain H. C. Miller Sr., of Bren­ham *      
Historic Trees of Texas
A. T. Jackson.
A number of trees notable for their beauty and especially for their historical significance are described in this article. One of the most famous trees inter­twined with Texas history is "The 'I'reaty Oak" -a great live oak which stands near the west bank of the Colo­rado River, within the city limits of Austin.  Another tree mentioned is a beautiful, moss-cover­ed tree under which General Sam Houston lay wounded, after the Bat­tle of San Jacinto, when General San­ta Anna was brought captive before him.  Another tree of great historic inter­est is that Beneath a large live ­oak Near the courthouse inn the town of ColumbusTexas.  Also mentioned is a large oak tree on the banks of the Leon River, a few hundred yards south of the bridge on the Belton-Temple pike.
Further mentions:   the first election in Bell County * a great live oak grow­ing at Rio Frio, in Real County * the largest tree in Texas, from the standpoint of size of trunk * 600 year old tree.  The branches of this gigantic oak have a spread of 127 feet * The State Federation of Women's Clubs * John R. Harris * Stephen F. Austin * Ben Milam Chapter of the Daughters of the Re­public of Texas *       
"The Battle Of Devil's River"
D. C. McMeans.
Story about a bloody fight with Indians in the spring of 1873, between the Sycamore and Devil's River that resulted in the scalping and near death of the author. 
Mentions:  a little place called Brack­ett * Jim Adams, who made up a cow outfit * Mr. Adams * the cook (old Jake) * Wiley Tarter * L. D. Walters, of TucsonArizona * Joshua Copper­smith *      
Baron Buried Where He FellSam Ashburn in Western Weekly Magazine
A member of German royal­ty, Texas settler and rancher Edward Baron von Woehrmann is credited with having brought the first sheep to southwest Texas.  He was brutally cut off by an ambush bullet on April 21, 1877, and was buried where he fell.  This was at a time when there was great resentment between cattlemen and the early sheep ranchers.
Further mentions:    Live Oak Canyon, near UvaldeTex­as * Pecos county * Ex-Texas Ranger R. G. Kimbell *   
Sketch Of Panhandle's First Settlements
Charles Goodnight.
This is an excellent account of the very earliest explorations and settlements in the Panhandle.  Written by a man who ought to know, it is an excellent piece of research and history.  If you are interested in early Panhandle history, it is a must-have. 
Mentions:  the Wichita Mountains * Western Cross Timbers * Lieutenant Woolfork * Young County * old Fort Belknap * Pease River * Captain Marcy * Fort Cobb, now inOklahoma * Canyon Ceta Blanca, near Canyon City.  * Paloduro * Fort Elliott * the Quitaque County * T. S. Bugbee * the organization of Donley County * Mobeetie * WheelerCounty * Rev. E. Dubbs He was elected County Judge of Wheeler County * the Christian Colony reached Donley County, and settled on Salt Fork at the mouth of Carroll Creek seven miles north of Clarendon * The Rev. J. J. Stanton * the Quitaque and Matador Ranch * the Panhandle Cattle Association * Judge O. H. Nelson * Donley County * The organization was made with G. A. Brown, as Coun­ty Judge, John. W. Wilson, sheriff ; W. D. Kindall, treasurer ; J. H. Parks, sur­veyor ; C.. Goodnight, T. W. Morrison and L. R. Dyer, county commissioners * Judge White * W. L. R. Dixon * John W. Poe, a deputy sheriff of Mobeetie * the noted "Billy, The Kid,"  * Pat Garrett * Tascosa *                             
The Story Of Will C. Barnes
By W. W. Wheeler.
Fifty-Seven Men and the en­tire race of Longhorn cattle owe their lives to Will C. Barnes, who was assistant forester in the De­partment of Agriculture and formerly a soldier, ranchman, legislator and ad­venturer.  His bravery  in 1880 saved the garrison of, Fort ApacheAriz., from extinction by five hundred Indians who had surrounded the fort. The Con­gress of theUnited States voted to him for that distinguished exploit its notable military tribute, the congres­sional medal of honor.  This is his story.
Further mentions:   the Wichita National Forest in Oklahoma * Fort Apache * Camp Thomas * a civilian scout named Owens * A harmless Apache medicine man, Nock-ay-de-klinne * a way station now called Wilcox * Gifford Pinchot * the Signal Corps * Lieut. A. W. Greeley * Senator John B. Kendrick, Wyoming ranchman *         
By E. M. Ainsworth.
Description of lifestyle and interesting information regarding this unique Indian tribe.
Mentions:  George W. Barcus, as­sociate justice of the Tenth Court of Civil appeals at WacoTexas * Taos and other sections of New Mexico * Carlsbad Cavern *  
Texas Gave 3,000,000 Acres For Capitol Building
Account describes the 1882 deal that was struck between the State of Texas, and the organization that was contracted to build the magnificent capitol building in Austin: the payoff – three million acres of “worthless” land which eventually produced an unimaginable fortune for the Chicago builders.
Further mentions:   John V. Farwell of Chicago * the Farwell Syndicate * Amos C. Babcock of Chicago * the present site of Amarillo * Charles B. Farwell and Abner Taylor * Mattheas Schnell of Rock IslandIllinois * A. A. Burck * RockdaleTexas * Mr. Schnell * Amos C. Babcock, * Judge A. W. Terrell of Austin *
John P. Daggett And His Cowboys
By Emiline Gardenhire
This is a story of a cattle outfit that moved off of Cedar Creek in Stephens County,  Texas in 1879 and belonged to Jim Fridge and a Mr. McKee and settled on Little Wichita in BaylorCounty fifteen miles east of the little town of Seymour.   About the year 1887, it was purchas­ed by John P. Daggett and became one of the best managed ranches in the West. John Daggett trained some young cowboys up on this ranch that was among the best in the Western country.  A few of them were: J. J. and M. A. Coates, W. L. Lyon, Jim Whisenant and (E. M.) Emiline Gardenhire, the writer of this account,  who became one of the famous ropers and riders of Texas.
Further mentions:   "Little Charlie" Dagget * the Dag­get brothers, "Bud," John and Charlie * Sam Wright * "Uncle Bunk" Adams- the best cowboy fiddler that ever drew a bow * Indian Creek in the Ike Newton range * Big Wichita River in Bay­lor county * Greer county * Knox county, Throckmorton county, Jack county, Wichita county, Ford county * the ranch on Boggy Creek near its mouth on the Big Wichita * the Wichita Valley R. R. built through the U. S. range * Dag­gett's ranch * Brigadier General F. P. Lahm * Chas. H. Coe * A. M. Collins
A Rare Old Cook Book
Mrs. Fletcher P. Layton, of MedinaTexas includes some recipes from pioneer days.  It is titled "The Great West­ern Cook Book," and it was used by Mrs. Layton's mother, Mrs. Coleman, in the 1860’s.  Some excerpts:
To Roast a Saddle of Venison
To preserve the fat, make a paste of flour and water, as much as will cover the venison; wipe the meat dry, rub some butter over a large sheet of pa­per, and cover the venison with it; then roll out the paste about three ­quarters of an Inch thick, and lay this all over the fat side, and cover it well with three or four sheets of strong, white paper, and tie it down securely. Have a strong fire, and baste the veni­son as soon as you lay it down to roast. It must be well basted all the time. A quarter of an hour before it is done, the string must be cut, and the paste carefully taken off; then baste it with butter, dredge it lightly with flour, and, when the froth rises…
To Roast a Turkey
Put the stuffing in under the breast, where the craw was taken out. Dredge the turkey well with flour, and baste it with melted butter. Keep it at a distance from the fire for the first half-hour, that it may warm gradual­ly, then put it nearer, and when it is plumped up, and the steam draws near the fire…
Bride's Cake
Two pounds of sifted flour, two pounds of sifted loaf sugar, two pounds of fresh butter, eighteen eggs four pounds of currants, one pound of raisins, stoned and cut up; one half pound of almonds, blanched and chop­ped; one half pound of citron, one pound of, candied orange and lemon peel, cut into thin slices; a large nut­meg, grated; half an ounce of ground allspice; of ground cinnamon, mace, ginger, and corianders, a quarter of an ounce each, and a gill of brandy. Put the butter into a suitable vessel, in a warm place, cream it with the, hand, and mix it with the sugar and spices for some time; break in the eggs by de­grees, and beat it twenty or thirty minutes; stir in the brandy, and then the flour, gradually; beat it well; then add the fruit, sweetmeats, and al­monds, and mix all lightly together. Put it in a' cake pan, and bake it four hours or more, in a slow oven. The goodness-of a cake depends very much on its being well baked. When it is nearly cold, ice it, according to the following, recipe:
Take a pound of double refined loaf sugar, pounded and sifted through a fine sieve; beat the whites of six eggs into a froth; put in the sugar gradual­ly, beating it well; then…
Johnny Cake
To a quart of sweet corn meal…
Terrible dream leads to the dfiscovery of an even more terrible disaster on April 14, 1856.
Mentions:  Jacob Dibert * Blue Lodge* PaviaPa., forty miles from Cumber­landMd. * the Lost Children 'of the Alleghenies. " * Samuel Cox * Spruce Hollow * Harrison Whyson * Mrs. Sarah M. Daughtery of JohnstownPa * Mrs. Amos Edwards and Mrs. Fred Brown of Alum Bark * Samuel Cox, DaleGa *        
Saw Race Of Natchez With Steamer Robert E. Lee
By William C. Stewart.
Account of the history of steamboats on the Mississippi, steamboat racing and one very special race in particular – the epochal race between the Natchez and the Robert E, Lee.
Further mentions:   The Bogie, a gasoline speedboat * Dr. Louis Leroy of MemphisTenn * the yacht Martha Jane * Mrs. Mary C. Brown of Fort Worth * Former Gov. H. C. War­mouth of Louisiana * Two Fort Worth men, E. W. Provine and Henry Gernbacher * Lee Gernsbacher * Capt. B. B. Paddock of Fort Worth * The explosion of the Brandywine, one of the earliest and most frightful disasters of western waters * a race between the Brandy­wine and the Hudson * the St. Joseph * Probably the greatest race, despite the claims of the Lee and the Natchez, was that between the Eclipse and Shotwell in 1853 * Capt. E. T. Stur­geon * Capt. B. L. Elliott * a boat called the J. M. White * John Hay, one of the early chroniclers of the Mississippi steam­boat * Jim Bludso * the Prairie Belle * the Movastar * Capt. Thomas P. Leathers (Old Push), most famous of all latter­day captains * Capt. John W. Cannon * Captain Leathers * the New Orleans Picayune * Tex Richards * Frank Parguad * Captain Cannon *                         
Texas Prairie Fires
Account of some of the more significant prarie fires of Texas and some of the intersting techniques employed in battling these feroscious blazes. 
Mentions:  A sereis of the three large blazes that start­ed near Midland in 1902 and burned up to about the south section line of the city of Lubbock one day and night, another started in New Mexico and burned across the northern part of this county and others on a line with that territory, on March 3, 1904, finally stopping when it reached Blanco Can­yon * a fire that was started near Grovesville * Fire which de­stroyed grass on thirty-five or forty sections of land on the Spade ranch, west of Lubbock *  one that surrounded the little Quaker colony of Estacado * J. Winford Hunt, who edited the only paper in Lubbock at that time * the Nunn, T­Bar and other ranches * the town of Aber­nathy * Crosby or Floyd county * the Yellowhouse canyon * Dr. M. C. Overton * the Yellowhouse ranch headquarters * J. B. Earhart * the old McKenzie trail *          
John H. Kirby Goes Home; Is Host To Many
Account of the life and labors of pioneer East Texas school teacher, Frank P. Crow, and his wonderful influence for many years at the Buxton School, at Peach Tree Village.
Further mentions:    Mr. Kirby * Austin Callan, well­known Texas newspaper man * the Alabama Indians * Sun-Kee, the chief * Dr. O. Eastland * F. M. McCaleb * Mrs. O. C. Cutter, of PalestineTexas * Mr. J. P. Wilson, Jasper, Texas *       
Indiana Banker, Once A Cowhand, Returns To Range
H. S. Hunter.
Account of Mr. O. S. Clark, who in 1881 along with friend, Charley Shideler drifted to the Texas Panhandle. They set up ranching in a small way in the north fork of Palo Duro canyon. While in the Panhandle, Mr. Clark says he and his partner also found time to work for some of the big cat­tle companies. They mingled more or less with, the Goodnight out­fit, the LX, the famous Hashknife…Tascosa was his stomping ground when the urge for town hit him. And sometimes, if he must travel far, Dodge City.              Later the urge to be a banker struck him and he ended up for a period in AtticaIndiana.  This is his story.
Further mentions:   the Central National Bank and Trust Co. * the San Luis valley of Colorado * Joshua Ray­nolds * Bat Mastereson * Luke Short, the Earp brothers and Doc Holliday * Clay Allison, "killer of bad men * Billy the Kid * Charley Siringo * Jim East * Pecos City * Fort Sumner * Pat Garrett * Charley Bowdre *
Delivers Message That Caught Chief Rain-In-The-Face
Account of Cornelius A. Craven, famed Indian scout, who for many years owned the Open Buckle ranch south of Kandoka.  During the Custer Indian massacre he was employed as a government scout. At this time he carried the mes­sage from Fort Bend Cloud, now Fort Robinson, to Fort FettermanMont., which resulted in the capture of Chief Rain-in-the-Face and Chief Crazy Horse, who had been instrumental in the massacre of Custer and his army.
Further mentions:   the Battle of Wounded Knee * Deadwood, Custer and Rapid City * his friends, Jim Dahlman and Hank Simmons * Craven CreekNebraska * the Cheyenne rivercountry * the Pine Ridge country * the Cheyenne river ranch * Hermosa * General Carr *                     
Edward Borein, Etcher Of The West
Account of one of America's foremost cowboy artists, especially of the horses and cattle and life on the ranges of the Old West as he himself lived it in his early days. Mr. Borein's etchings are known in most of the galleries of America, and he ranks today as one of the great artists in the medium depicting the life of the cowboy.
Further mentions:   Charles Elliott Per­kins * Wallace Heb­berd of Santa Barbara * Guadala­jara and Zacatecas * Santa Cruz, San Luis Rey, Purissima, Dolores, and San Luis Obispo *   
The bodies of Capt. Mosely Baker and his wife have been exhumed from an abandoned cemetery adjoining Sam Houston Park in Houston and reburied in the State Cemeteryat Austin, Sep­tember 20.   Captain Baker burned San Felipe de Austin to prevent its capture by the Mexican General, Santa Anna, and later commanded Company D of Texas Patriots at the Battle of San Jacinto. He was born in NorfolkVa.Sept. 20, 1802, moving early in life to Alabama, where he was admitted to the bar. He arrived inTexas March 2, 1835, with his wife and daughter, and Oct. 9 of that year secured a league of land in Zavala's colony on the east shore of Galveston Bay. He early opposed …
Further mentions:   Company D of Gen. Edward Burleson's regiment * Archibald Wynnes * His wife, Eliza Ward Baker * Their daughter, Fannie, married A. D. Dardin * Hance Baker, of La Porte *

Mentions:  Tom and John Platt * John W. Bracken * His father was a Ser­geant in Rip Fords Company, in the Mexican War * Five of the boys were State Rangers, Tom, Sam, John, Jake and Radd * McMurray's Company * Rev. J. T. Barr, of Midland * James Rusk

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